the color of law

The Color Of Law  A Forgotten History Of How Our Government Segregated America
Author: Richard Rothstein
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
Release Date: 2017-05-02
Pages: 368
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

New York Times Bestseller • Notable Book of the Year • Editors' Choice Selection One of Bill Gates’ “Amazing Books” of the Year One of Publishers Weekly’s 10 Best Books of the Year Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction An NPR Best Book of the Year Winner of the Hillman Prize for Nonfiction Gold Winner • California Book Award (Nonfiction) Finalist • Los Angeles Times Book Prize (History) Finalist • Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize This “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide (New York Times Book Review). Widely heralded as a “masterful” (Washington Post) and “essential” (Slate) history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history (Chicago Daily Observer), The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.

Under The Color Of Law
Author: Michael McGarrity
Publisher: Penguin
Release Date: 2001-07-01
Pages: 400
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Newly-installed Santa Fe police chief Kevin Kerney receives a deadly welcome when a U.S. ambassador's ex-wife is brutally stabbed to death in her home. But before Kerney can begin to investigate, the FBI closes the case with trumped-up evidence. And the harder Kerney hunts for the truth, the more he knows that he may not survive the chase.

The Color Of Crime
Author: Katheryn Russell-Brown
Publisher: NYU Press
Release Date: 2009
Pages: 213
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

"Perhaps the most explosive and troublesome phenomenon at the nexus of race and crime is the racial hoax - a contemporary version of The Boy Who Cried Wolf. Examining both White-on-Black hoaxes such as Susan Smith's and Charles Stuart's claims that Black men were responsible for crimes they themselves committed, and Black-on-White hoaxes such as the Tawana Brawley episode, Russell illustrates the formidable and lasting damage that occurs when racial stereotypes are manipulated and exploited for personal advantage. She shows us how such hoaxes have disastrous consequences and argues for harsher punishments for offenders."--BOOK JACKET.

The Color Of Law
Author: Steve Babson
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
Release Date: 2010
Pages: 558
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Biography of Ernie Goodman, a Detroit lawyer and political activist who played a key role in social justice cases.

Under The Color Of Law
Author: Martin Henn
Publisher: Lexington Books
Release Date: 2012-07-10
Pages: 292
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Under the Color of Law constitutes a full and critical scholarly commentary to the text of five key Bush administration legal memoranda formative of U.S. counterterrorism policy from 2001 to 2009. This volume is dedicated to the idea that these documents are worthy of being read and critically examined in themselves as primary text, precisely because the act of critical assessment may yield meaningful policy reform in the ongoing debate facing the nation over balancing security interests with the preservation of civil liberties. This volume is intended to provide counterpoint for, and antithesis to, positions vigorously defended by President Bush's attorneys working at the OLC inside the Department of Justice, and it is designed to be used primarily in conjunction with and examined as response to the Bush-era documents themselves. Martin Henn investigates five central questions, each framed around commentary to a specific administration document. This work addresses the Yoo-Flanigan Memorandum of September 25, 2001, and asks whether any President has constitutional power to initiate a foreign war without congressional authorization. Regarding President Bush's November 13 executive order of 2001, Henn asks whether an emergency of war permits any President to usurp judicial and legislative powers to interpret law and define and punish offences against the law of nations. Along with many other questions these documents initiate, the author carefully analyzes and seeks to answer questions regarding the Bush administration, the use of interrogational coercion and torture in the war on terror.

The Colour Of Law
Author: Mark Gimenez
Publisher: Hachette UK
Release Date: 2008-09-04
Pages: 512
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

A. Scott Fenney is a hotshot corporate lawyer at a big Dallas firm. At 33, in the prime of his life, he rakes in $750,000 a year, drives a Ferrari and comes home every night to a mansion in Dallas's most exclusive neighbourhood. He also comes home to one of Dallas's most beautiful women, with whom he has a much-loved daughter, Boo. For Fenney, life could not be better. But when a senator's son is killed in a hit-and-run, Fenney is asked by the state judge to put his air-conditioned lifestyle on hold to defend the accused: a black, heroin-addicted prostitute - a very different client to the people Fenney usually represents. And, more importantly, she is not going be paying Ford Stevens $350 an hour for the privilege of his services. Under fire from all sides, Fenney drafts in a public defender to take the case on. Yet as Scott prepares to hand over to Bobby, he feels increasingly guilty about the path he is taking, because Scott still believes in the principle of justice. The question is: does he believe in it strongly enough to jeopardise everything in his life he holds dear? And to what lengths is the dead man's power-hungry father prepared to go to test Fenney's resolve?

The Color Of The Law
Author: Gail Williams O'Brien
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
Release Date: 2011-02-01
Pages: 352
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

On February 25, 1946, African Americans in Columbia, Tennessee, averted the lynching of James Stephenson, a nineteen-year-old, black Navy veteran accused of attacking a white radio repairman at a local department store. That night, after Stephenson was safely out of town, four of Columbia's police officers were shot and wounded when they tried to enter the town's black business district. The next morning, the Tennessee Highway Patrol invaded the district, wrecking establishments and beating men as they arrested them. By day's end, more than one hundred African Americans had been jailed. Two days later, highway patrolmen killed two of the arrestees while they were awaiting release from jail. Drawing on oral interviews and a rich array of written sources, Gail Williams O'Brien tells the dramatic story of the Columbia "race riot," the national attention it drew, and its surprising legal aftermath. In the process, she illuminates the effects of World War II on race relations and the criminal justice system in the United States. O'Brien argues that the Columbia events are emblematic of a nationwide shift during the 1940s from mob violence against African Americans to increased confrontations between blacks and the police and courts. As such, they reveal the history behind such contemporary conflicts as the Rodney King and O. J. Simpson cases.

The Color Of Money
Author: Mehrsa Baradaran
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release Date: 2017
Pages: 360
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Forty acres or a savings bank -- Capitalism without capital -- The rise of black banking -- The new deal for white America -- Civil rights dreams, economic nightmares -- The decoy of black capitalism -- The free market confronts black poverty -- The color of money matters

The Color Of Creatorship
Author: Anjali Vats
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Release Date: 2020-09-29
Pages: 296
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

The Color of Creatorship examines how copyright, trademark, and patent discourses work together to form American ideals around race, citizenship, and property. Working through key moments in intellectual property history since 1790, Anjali Vats reveals that even as they have seemingly evolved, American understandings of who is a creator and who is an infringer have remained remarkably racially conservative and consistent over time. Vats examines archival, legal, political, and popular culture texts to demonstrate how intellectual properties developed alongside definitions of the "good citizen," "bad citizen," and intellectual labor in racialized ways. Offering readers a theory of critical race intellectual property, Vats historicizes the figure of the citizen-creator, the white male maker who was incorporated into the national ideology as a key contributor to the nation's moral and economic development. She also traces the emergence of racial panics around infringement, arguing that the post-racial creator exists in opposition to the figure of the hyper-racial infringer, a national enemy who is the opposite of the hardworking, innovative American creator. The Color of Creatorship contributes to a rapidly-developing conversation in critical race intellectual property. Vats argues that once anti-racist activists grapple with the underlying racial structures of intellectual property law, they can better advocate for strategies that resist the underlying drivers of racially disparate copyright, patent, and trademark policy.

Color Of Law
Author: Regis Nziengui
Publisher:
Release Date: 2020-08-14
Pages: 67
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Twentyscore and one year ago (401 years) racism in the world, especially in the United States of America, has been present. Starting in 1619 when 20 Africans were brought to Jamestown, Virginia. European descendants were given the privilege to own Africans as their property. Then Africans were brainwashed to forget their identities and origins. Africans were named after their slave owners. They were lynched in public when they refused to comply to send a message to the next one who didn't cooperate. African names were substituted with plantation names. This was done knowing a man who does not have an identity will accept any identity. In this book, Color Of Law, you will discover with surgical precision where and when racism and slavery began. And the impact these pandemics have on our societies even now in the 21st century. The author, Regis, will give you tools to eradicate this pandemic called racism. You cannot eradicate or heal a pathology if you do not know is origin or root. Regis will dive back into the 17th, 18th, 19th and the 20th centuries to reveal the moral and physical atrocities that African Americans went through even until today in the 21st century. Since the Revolutionary War in 1775-1783 African Americans have been loyal to their country. They were not even considered humans even on July 4th 1776 after the writing of the Declaration of Independence. This written by Thomas Jefferson, the third U. S. president. They established the United States Colored Troop (USCT) and African Americans fought with desire and honor. In 1861-1865 during the Civil War, African Americans were on the front lines and they defeated the Confederate Army. The Confederate Army was led by General Robert E. Lee. On January 1,1863, President Abraham Lincoln wrote the Emancipation Proclamation in recognition of the courage and bravery of African Americans who literally fought to be free. On July 1st-3rd of 1863 at Gettysburg, a battle took place. General George Gordon Meade of the Union Army defeated the Confederate Army led by General Robert E. Lee. On November 19, 1863, President Lincoln wrote the Gettysburg Address and gave his speech at the National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania for a dedication of the soldiers. On April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Court House in Virginia, General Robert E. Lee surrendered his army in Northern Virginia to the Union Army led by General Ulysses S. Grant. This was the end of the Civil War. The 13th Amendment was passed by Congress on January 31, 1865 and ratified on December 6, 1865. The 13th Amendment abolished slavery in the United States and stated, "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States or any place subject to their jurisdiction". On April 16, 1862 President Lincoln signed the District of Columbia Compensated Emancipation Act. This Law prohibited slavery in the District, forcing its 900-odd slaveholders to free their slaves. The government paid owners an average of about $300 per slave which is equivalent to $8000 in 2020. African Americans have contributed to and participated in the United States democracy. When the Civil War was over, the United States was under reconstruction. President Lincoln was assassinated five days after the Civil War was over. On April 14, 1865 at Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C President Lincoln was killed by John Wilkes Booth, a white actor and ex- Confederate soldier. Then President Andrew Johnson led the country. In 1866 six veterans of the Confederate Army established the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) in Pulaski, Tennessee. Nathan Bedford Forrest was elected the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan from 1867-1869. He was an ex-Confederate Army General. They established this association to oppress and lynch African Americans in the Southern states. The Jim Crow laws followed.