stumbling on happiness

Stumbling On Happiness
Author: Daniel Gilbert
Publisher: Vintage
Release Date: 2006-05-02
Pages: 304
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Bringing to life scientific research in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, philosophy, and behavioral economics, this bestselling book reveals what scientists have discovered about the uniquely human ability to imagine the future, and about our capacity to predict how much we will like it when we get there. • Why are lovers quicker to forgive their partners for infidelity than for leaving dirty dishes in the sink? • Why will sighted people pay more to avoid going blind than blind people will pay to regain their sight? • Why do dining companions insist on ordering different meals instead of getting what they really want? • Why do pigeons seem to have such excellent aim; why can’t we remember one song while listening to another; and why does the line at the grocery store always slow down the moment we join it? In this brilliant, witty, and accessible book, renowned Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert describes the foibles of imagination and illusions of foresight that cause each of us to misconceive our tomorrows and misestimate our satisfactions. With penetrating insight and sparkling prose, Gilbert explains why we seem to know so little about the hearts and minds of the people we are about to become. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Stumbling On Happiness
Author: Daniel Todd Gilbert
Publisher: Vintage Canada
Release Date: 2007
Pages: 336
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Why are lovers quicker to forgive their partners for infidelity than for leaving dirty dishes in the sink? Why do patients remember long medical procedures as less painful than short ones? Why do home sellers demand prices they wouldn't dream of paying if they were home buyers? Why does the line at the grocery store always slow down when we join it? In this book, Harvard psychologist Gilbert describes the foibles of imagination and illusions of foresight that cause each of us to misconceive our tomorrows and misestimate our satisfactions. Using the latest research in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, philosophy, and behavioral economics, Gilbert reveals what we have discovered about the uniquely human ability to imagine the future, our capacity to predict how much we will like it when we get there, and why we seem to know so little about the hearts and minds of the people we are about to become.--From publisher description.

Stumbling Toward Happiness
Author: Kat Lehmann
Publisher:
Release Date: 2019-08-04
Pages: 106
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Happiness meditations. Field notes from an inward journey home. With 111 meditations of interconnected poetry and prose compiled into in 9 chapters, Stumbling Toward Happiness is an all-immersive journey of self-discovery, personal transformation, and triumph. The relatable insights celebrate the process of growth and the personal and enduring center of joy within. Like a diary of inner travel, this third book in its series is rooted in the lived experience that happiness is a journey not a destination. These elegant Japanese-form hybrid poems, called haibun and tanka prose, combine a lyrical paragraph of spiritual reflection with a haiku, tanka, or other 1-5 line "small stone" poem that expands its meaning. Informed by the author's deep contemplation of nature as a scientist and a poet and reminiscent of the reflections of Mark Nepo and Mary Oliver, the book encourages deep soul-searching. Themes include connection and compassion, the gifts of imperfection, radical forgiveness, the search for happiness and healing, a return to simple abundance, and awakening to the wonder of the universe and ourselves. Stumbling Toward Happiness will resonate with every reader as they reflect on their own source of inner wisdom and joy.

Happy Money
Author: Elizabeth Dunn
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
Release Date: 2013-05-14
Pages: 224
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Two professors combine their fascinating and cutting-edge research in behavioral science to explain how money can buy happiness—if you follow five core principles of smart spending. Most people recognize that they need professional advice on how to earn, save, and invest their money. When it comes to spending that money, most people just follow their intuitions. But scientific research shows that those intuitions are often wrong. Happy Money offers a tour of research on the science of spending, explaining how you can get more happiness for your money. Authors Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton have outlined five principles—from choosing experiences over stuff to spending money on others—to guide not only individuals looking for financial security, but also companies seeking to create happier employees and provide “happier products” to their customers. Dunn and Norton show how companies from Google to Pepsi to Charmin have put these ideas into action. Along the way, Dunn and Norton explore fascinating research that reveals that luxury cars often provide no more pleasure than economy models, that commercials can actually enhance the enjoyment of watching television, and that residents of many cities frequently miss out on inexpensive pleasures in their hometowns. By the end of this “lively and engaging book” (Dan Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness), you’ll be asking yourself one simple question every time you reach for your wallet: Am I getting the biggest happiness bang for my buck?

Stumbling Into Happiness
Author: Michael Schoenhofer
Publisher: Bookbaby
Release Date: 2017-10-21
Pages: 234
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

The true story of how, as a young priest is sent to Zimbabwe, falls in love and finally finds himself and happiness. He doesn't know what he's getting himself into--but finds himself on a journey that goes far beyond anything he could have expected. Tasked with building a mission from the ground up--literally--Mike Schoenhofer quickly realizes that he still has a lot to learn about life, work, and love. In a totally unfamiliar place, with an unfamiliar people, Mike has to learn a new language, a new culture, and connect with the Tonga people, while managing his own difficult team. But even as the success of the mission grows, and the Tongas embrace him as one of their own, he still feels something is missing. When he meets a pretty, funny young nun, he is finally forced to re-examine everything he's believed, including his own struggle with his commitment to the priesthood. Part adventure, part romance, part coming-of-age, author Michael Schoenhofer takes readers on his journey through the often funny, sometimes painful, and totally relatable tale of how he finally stumbled into happiness. Stumbling Into Happiness has the self-discovery and adventure of Cheryl's Strayed's Wild and Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat Pray Love. Each memoirist is on a journey to find herself, and traveling to unfamiliar places and shaking up their lives in a huge way is the catalyst to soul-searching and self-discovery that sets them down a new path. What sets Stumbling into Happiness apart is the added layer of struggle with religious faith, and more significantly, that it's told by a male narrator. The religious theme could be played up or down, depending on the market we decided to focus on. In any case, our main character Mike Schoenhofer is a likable, honest narrator sharing a universal story - the search for self, and the search for happiness, a common human goal whether the searcher is a recent divorcee or a young priest not sure he made the right choice by entering the clergy. Schoenhofer's easy, detailed but passionate prose has a Garrison Keillor-like appeal.

Teaching Happiness And Well Being In Schools
Author: Ian Morris
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Release Date: 2009-10-29
Pages: 256
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

There has recently been an explosion of interest in positive psychology and the teaching of well-being and 'happiness' in the PSHE world in schools and many teachers are looking for clear information on how to implement these potentially life-changing ideas in the classroom. This book provides an introduction to the theory of positive psychology and a practical guide on how to implement the theory in (primarily secondary) schools. The American psychologist and writer Martin Seligman, well known for his work on the idea of 'learned helplessness', has more recently been working in the field of positive psychology. He has led training in resilience in a number of UK local authorities. Wellington College, where Ian Morris is head of philosophy, religion and PSHE, is among the first UK schools to introduce a formal well-being and happiness curriculum developed by the author.

Happiness Center
Author: Moaml Mohmmed
Publisher:
Release Date: 2019-08-03
Pages: 34
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Happiness CenterHappiness is not for sale . Why Rich People Really Aren't Happier?Happy amnesia The ability to imagine -- to try to predict our future state of mind -- is what sets us apart from less-evolved species. It's also the very thing that stunts our shot at true happiness.We assume that a sportier car, a bigger house, a better-paying job, or that dress will bring us joy because, well, they did in the past, right?Not really, says Daniel Gilbert, a Harvard psychology professor and the author of Stumbling on Happiness. "Research reveals that memory is less like a collection of photographs than it is like a collection of impressionist paintings rendered by an artist who takes considerable license with his subject," Gilbert writes. We forget that the new-car high deflated well before our first trip to the mechanic, and the raise came with stressful late nights at the office and a steeper tax tab.Our appetite for self-destruction What's so wrong with relishing and embellishing the good? It's costly. Faulty emotional recall makes us do dumb things with our money, like buying cool new stuff that never quite satisfies.In so many areas, we know when enough is enough. When we're healthy, we don't strive for extreme health. After a good meal, we're sated -- we don't order another filet mignon to augment our satisfaction.Yet our "pause" button shorts out when it comes to money. The brief pick-me-up that accompanies a raise or windfall (think of it like a caffeine buzz) drives us to want more. We get a raise, spend it, adapt to our improved circumstances, and seek more money, working up a sweat on what University of Southern California economist Richard Easterlin calls the hedonic treadmill.But somehow the happy-o-meter stays in the same place, or even slows down. Consider that the average American is less satisfied with life today than we were in the 1950s -- yet we earn twice as much (and, yes, that's adjusted for inflation). No wonder they never crown a winner of the rat race.How much is enough? Absent total emotion recall and the ability to recognize when we've hit our happy set point, what will make us happy? How's $50,000 a year sound? That's the contentment calculation from a Roper/ASW survey a few years ago.Of course, the amount is relative, but consider what it represents to the average (non-Manhattan-rent-paying) American: It's enough to cover the bills and have some fun money left over.After that, each incremental move up the pay scale has less long-term emotional impact. A 20% raise won't make you 20% happier. And, in fact, chasing that extra 10 grand might just make you miserable.So the guy in the corner office may actually be more bummed out than those of us in the cheap seats. Does that news bring a smile to your face? If so, it's OK with us.

Happy At Last
Author: Richard O'Connor
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
Release Date: 2009-12-22
Pages: 320
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Happiness has been written about by everyone from the Dalai Lama (The Art of Happiness) to Daniel Gilbert (Stumbling on Happiness), but in Happy At Last Richard O’Connor takes a fresh look at what happiness is, why we are happy (or not) and how we can stay happy. How? He says we can rewire our brain to be more receptive to happiness by learning to control how our minds work. Drawing on the latest scientific and psychological research, and filled with practical advice and exercises, Happy At Last is the definitive guide to understanding: • The core skills that we need to feel fulfilled in today’s world • Strategies for increasing happiness • Techniques for keeping sadness and stress at bay. Richard O’Connor makes it possible to be, finally, Happy At Last!

If Not ME  Then WHO  Practice Confidence  Stumbling Upon
Author:
Publisher:
Release Date:
Pages:
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

Semiotics Of Happiness
Author: Ashley Frawley
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Release Date: 2015-02-26
Pages: 240
ISBN:
Available Language: English, Spanish, And French
EBOOK SYNOPSIS:

The Semiotics of Happiness examines the rise of 'happiness' (and its various satellite terminologies) as a social and political semiotic, exploring its origins in the US and subsequent spread into the UK and across the globe. The research takes as its starting point the development of discussions about happiness in UK newspapers in which dedicated advocates began to claim that a new 'science of happiness' had been discovered and argued for social and political change on its behalf. Through an in-depth analysis of the written and visual rhetoric and subsequent activities of these influential 'claims-makers', Frawley argues that happiness became a serious political issue not because of a growing unhappiness in society nor a demand 'on the ground' for new knowledge about it, but rather because influential and dedicated 'insiders' took the issue on at a cultural moment when problems cast in emotional terms were particularly likely to make an impact. Emerging from the analysis is the observation that, while apparently positive and light-hearted, the concern with happiness implicitly affirms a 'vulnerability' model of human functioning, encourages a morality of low expectations, and in spite of the radical language used to describe it, is ultimately conservative and ideally suited to an era of 'no alternative' (to capitalism).